Ask The Builder: Working Safely With A Nail Gun

DEAR BRIAN: These tools are enormous time savers, and theyre also wicked machines that can be deadly. They must be treated just the same as you would treat a loaded handgun or a rifle. Most shoot an assortment of nails that allow you to do just about every rough carpentry task. You can bang together stud walls, laminate structural headers and attach plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) sheathing to walls or roofs. The tools can be adjusted so you drive the nail the proper depth. Always follow the building code requirements for the type of nail, the shape of the head and the depth to which it must be driven.
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Pneumatic Framing Nailers: Why Choose Coil over Stick?

Framing nailers come in two styles: coil and stick Coil nailers have an adjustable canister that accepts a coil of nails-up to 200 framing nails or 300 sheathing nails at a time–angled at 15 degrees and strung together by two thin wires welded to the shanks of the nails. These tools can fire a lot of nails between reloads. And their compact size offers some accessibility advantages. But a fully-loaded coil nailer can be heavy and unwieldy, especially for overhead work. Coil nailers are not as popular as stick nailers, but they do have a strong foothold in the Northeast, and in a few random pockets across the country, like Louisiana, Missouri, and Texas. Despite having less market share here in the United States, this is what the rest of the world considers a framing nailer.
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combo finish nail gun or framing gun?

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In North Carolina, the mean medical cost for claims was $1,497, and mean indemnity was $772. However, the high end of the claim range was $43,805 for medical and $104,191 for indemnity. In Ohio, mean non-lost time claim cost was $483, and the mean cost for indemnity claims was $9,237.
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Nail Gun Injuries in Construction

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He does tons of carpentry/construction work around the house. drywall work, roofing, furniture making, etc, crown molding, baseboard molding, etc. Does he need the framing gun or does the other do the tricks? Please advise? ***** associates not knowledgeable enough. Thanks Member Since: 07/01/03 558 lifetime posts From your description, the finish nailer combo will be best.
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