Cordless Nail Gun Comparison Test

OSHA: Nail guns dangerous, send 37,000 to hospital ER

Or, rather, they come with 3/8-inch pneumatic hoses attachedworking with a finish gun usually means lugging around a cumbersome compressor tethered to a tube. But finish guns are changing. There are now a variety of cordless options available, each with a different fuel source. So how do they measure up to the traditional air-powered gun? By Doug Mahoney
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Nail Gun Injuries Soar

They must be treated just the same as you would treat a loaded handgun or a rifle. Lets talk about what these tools can do first. Most of them shoot an assortment of nails that allow you to do just about every rough carpentry task I can think of. You can bang together stud walls, laminate structural headers, or attach plywood or oriented strand board sheathing to walls and roofs. The tools can be adjusted so that you drive the nail the proper depth. Be certain that you always follow the building code requirements for the type of nail, the shape of the head and the depth to which it must be driven. Be sure the nail gun you decide to purchase will work with code-compliant nails.
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Nail guns can be hugely helpful but also deadly dangerous

According to the American National Standards Institute, a manual trigger and a contact element in the nose of the nail gun are the two key components on firing mechanisms of nail guns that prevent unintentional firing. The sequential trip-trigger is the safest type of trigger. It requires the nose of the nail gun to be placed firmly on the work piece before the manual trigger is pulled for a nail to be discharged from the gun. This type of trigger makes unintentional nail discharge less likely. The U.S.
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Tips: Nail Gun Safety

Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said nail gun injuries are common — one study found 2-in-5 U.S. residential carpenter apprentices experienced a nail gun injury over a four-year period. Injuries resulting from use of nail guns hospitalize more construction workers than any other tool-related injury. When they do occur, these injuries are often not reported or given proper medical treatment, OSHA said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/07/17/OSHA-Nail-guns-dangerous-send-37000-to-hospital-ER/UPI-89471374102943/

That trend is likely due to the increase in the availability of nail guns at home hardware stores, but no sales data are available to confirm that, notes the CDC. Workers and consumers should make sure that their nail gun has a safety feature called a sequential-trip trigger, says the CDC in a news release. The CDC also says additional training material on nail gun safety should be provided wherever nail guns are sold and rented.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.webmd.com/news/20070412/nail-gun-injuries-soar