Framing Nailer Angle

framing nailer angle rnagg 0 Framing Nailer Angle


Framing Nailer Angle News:

21 Vs. 28 Degree Nailers | eHow.com

How to Pick a Framing Nailer; How to Determine the Angle of a Nail Gun; Comments You May Also Like. Nailer Roof Vs. Plywood. 21 Vs. 28 Degree Nailers.

Original Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_10062346_21-vs-28-degree-nailers.html

What angle framing nailer?

I have a project coming up and I am in the market for a framing nailer. I know I … First off, any gun will do the job. That said, there are a number of reasons that …

Original Source: http://www.woodworking.com/forum/showthread.php?14781-What-angle-framing-nailer

28° Angle Framing Nailer

28° Angle Framing Nailer: SKU: 69928: Brand: Central Pneumatic: Capacity: 100 Nails: Operating Pressure (PSI) 90 – 120: Required CFM @ Operating PSI: 3 @ 90: Product …

Original Source: http://www.harborfreight.com/28-angle-framing-nailer-69928.html

21 Vs. 28 Degree Nailers | eHow.com

How to Pick a Framing Nailer; How to Determine the Angle of a Nail Gun; Comments You May Also Like. Nailer Roof Vs. Plywood. 21 Vs. 28 Degree Nailers.

Original Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_10062346_21-vs-28-degree-nailers.html

21° Angle Framing Nailer – Harbor Freight Tools – Quality Tools …

Went through 3000 hitachi nails building a stockade fence. Had a few jams, no big deal. Oiled frequently to prevent problems. This gun was recommended by a finishing …

Original Source: http://www.harborfreight.com/21-angle-framing-nailer-69927.html


framing nailer angle rnagg 1 Framing Nailer Angle

Hitachi Tool Corner- NR90GR2 Learn More About Gas Powered Framing Nailers

Hitachi's NR90GR2 Gas Powered Plastic Strip Collated Framing Nailer combines utility with traditional nailing power. No compressor noise or hoses to wind sav…


buddy asked What is the difference in the degree angles of a pneumatic framing nail gun?

I am about to purchase a framing nail gun and I am not a professional framer. I have noticed there are guns with 21, 28, & 34 degree angles on their magazines. Why is this?
And what is the difference? I found a nail gun that will adjust to accommodate all three angles. What is the preferred nail guns angle used by professional framers?

And got the following answer:

The different angles take different nails. The 30-34 degree take the paper collated nails (such as Paslode), the 20-22 degree take full head plastic collated nails (Duo Fast, Porter-Cable FR350). 28 degree is wire collated (Bostitch). I would be VERY skeptical of any nailer that claimed to shoot all three. There is a huge difference in angle when it comes to the piston that actually drives the nail. Often, when a tool does 3 different things, it does each marginally rather than focusing on one task and doing it well. I prefer the 30-34 degree framers. I have a Porter Cable FC350. Now that Paslode has come up with a full head nail that fits these guns, I really like it. It holds more nails than the other styles, is a little lighter (especially the magnesium guns), and requires less maintenance. Hope this helps.

asif a asked What is the difference between brad nailer, finsh nailer and framig nailer?

Which one do I need for flexible floor moulding?

And got the following answer:

Brad nailers shoot 18 ga. headless fasteners from 5/8″ – 1 1/4″ long
Finish nailers shoot 16 ga headless fasteners 1″ – 2 1/2″
Angled finish nailers shoot 15 ga headless fasteners the same lenghts
Pinners shoot 23 ga very fine headless fasteners, 1/2″ – 1″
Framing nailers shoot 6d – 16d full or clipped head nails

I’d use the brad nailer for molding

daperdanguy asked Can Paslode Cordless Framing nailer be used for roof sheathing?

I am building a shed and was wondering if I can use my Paslode cordless Angled Framing Nailer 900420,
to install the OSB (plywood sheathing) to the roof and the sidewalls?

And got the following answer:

I agree with CJ. Be sure to buy shorter nails. I’ve got 3.5″ and 2″ nails for my nailer. The 2″ nails are great for fence facing, nailing up sheathing, etc.

Karry asked What if you would lay the deck boards diagnal? Therefore not having enough length to go all the way across? H?

What if you would lay the deck boards diagnal? Therefore not having enough length to go all the way across? Have a 10×16 deck framed and 16 ft deck boards therefore about 2 feet short on center boards. How would I butt up the joints? My floor joists are 2 ft centers. Should I cut ends of deck boards at angle so the two ends can overlap each other?

And got the following answer:

I think your best bet would be to cut both boards diagonally that meet up on one of your joists. You will have to butt them up on the joist. I would put a nailer on both sides of where you are butting the boards up though, and run the nailer long enough to strech the width of both boards. This will provide support on both sides and prevent a fall through scenario.

Chris asked When did nails and screws become common in home building?

Obviously, nails and screws are the common fastener for home building these days, but I am curious when they actually became the standard? I am having a debate with someone who seems to think that they are necessary to make a nice house, but this person doesn’t understand that they use to be very expensive; and as such, most homes were built without them. I just can’t figure out when that time frame was.

Any help on pinpointing the date would be helpful (with some citations would be preferable).

And got the following answer:

“I am having a debate with someone who seems to think that they are necessary to make a nice house”

Loghouses and log cabins were used by First Nations and settlers long before metal became used for nails, as did mud huts in Africa and thatch cottages in Britain, adobe brick houses in Mexico and the Mediterranean.
A nail is hardly the be all and end off of ‘nice house’ design.

“but I am curious when they actually became the standard?”

No clue, I cheated lol – the source link follows.

“In the 16th century the invention of the first water powered slitting mill introduced the first cut nails. Hot iron was hammered into sheets and each sheet was slit into bars by rollers that cut like shears. Each bar was then made into nails and spikes by “nailers”. The head and the point were still forged and this type of nail was used from the 16th to the 19th century.
In the year 1811 the first machine cut nails were produced. These nails were flat and had no head. Sections of rolled plate iron were cut into strips the same width as the length of the nail. Each strip was then place under a contraption that cut each nail at an angle. The sheet was then turned over and the next nail was cut. The result of this process produced a nail that tapered to a point on only two sided.
In the 1840’s a machine capable of making a headed nail was introduced. Stamping machines were being used by the late 1860’s and several types of nails could be stamped at the same time.
Wire nails are now common and are the dominate type of nails used today but cut nails can still be found and are not uncommon.

Early wood screws were developed in the mid 16th century. The wood screw which is really nothing more than a round nail with a threaded shaft and a slot in the head for removal was first used in locks and clocks. They were very expensive to produce and were not used for everyday woodworking.
The first machine made screws were introduced in the 18th century. They had blunt ends. The first pointed end screws were produced in the 1840’s by an English inventor George Nettlefield. They became widely used with this new type of production.”
http://ezinearticles.com/?Your-Wooden-Storage-Shed—The-History-of-Nails-and-Wood-Screws&id=3390880

Hope that helps :)

daperdanguy asked Can Paslode Cordless Framing nailer be used for roof sheathing?

I am building a shed and was wondering if I can use my Paslode cordless Angled Framing Nailer 900420,
to install the OSB (plywood sheathing) to the roof and the sidewalls?

And got the following answer:

I agree with CJ. Be sure to buy shorter nails. I’ve got 3.5″ and 2″ nails for my nailer. The 2″ nails are great for fence facing, nailing up sheathing, etc.