Law Firm Wins $2.5 Million Jury Verdict In Nail Gun Case

Hitachi Nail Gun Recalled Due to Multiple Eye Injuries

Hitachi Nail Gun Recalled Due to Multiple Eye Injuries

Hitachi Koki U.S.A., et al., Gordon and Bennett proved that their client, Mr. Martin Oliver, a journeyman carpenter with 40 years of experience, was severely injured when the defectively designed nail gun he was using discharged a nail into his head, penetrating his brain and leaving him permanently disabled. The nail guna Hitachi NR83Awas defective because it had a contact trip mechanism, which allows a nail to be fired when the nose of the nail gun is in contact with a surface and the trigger is pulled, regardless of the order in which those events occur. The fact that Hitachi’s gun didn’t have a sequential trip mechanism, which allows a nail to be fired only if the trigger is pulled after the gun’s nose contacts a surface, constituted a design defect. “In California, a product is defective in design if the benefits of that design do not outweigh the risks of danger inherent in that design,” according to Gordon.

Canada reported one instance of partial blindness out of the three individuals who sustained injuries. The Hitachi Coil Nailer is designed to fire nails into drywall, wood, and other surfaces. The coil style nail guns are loaded with nail strips that are flexible and carry a larger number of nails than traditional stick style nail guns. The recall will affect around 65,000 nail guns. This includes 50,000 guns in the U.S.
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