Man Shot In Heart When Nail Gun Goes Off: 37,000 Nail Gun Accidents Occur Yearly

Colorado CEO, under investigation, commits suicide with a nail gun

The emergency rooms around the country see many nails protruding out of hands and feet from a nail gun accident. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 37,000 people each year are treated for nail-gun injuries. A nail in the foot or in the hand is the most common for nail gun accidents.
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According to the Denver Post , Richard Talley, 57, and the company he founded in 2001 was under investigation by state insurance regulators at the time of his death late Tuesday. An Arapahoe County coroner spokeswoman said on Thursday that Talley was found in his garage by a family member who called authorities. The coroner determined that Talley died from seven or eight self-inflicted wounds from a nail gun fired into his torso and head.
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Nail Gun Injuries Surge

That ain’t no DIY job, in my opinion, albeit; with no initials after my last name. Nail guns are for affixing asphalt shingles to a roof; not for any sorta DIY kink, self crucifixion, or game in the garage. Anyone who has ever hit their finger or thumb with a hammer can tell you it hurt like _______, and they Shor Nuf were glad the nail slid by. _____________ Denver CEO found dead of grisly suicide by nail gun Under investigation, American Title CEO dead in grisly suicide By David Migoya The Denver Post Posted 02/07/2014 The founder and CEO of American Title Services in Centennial was found dead in his home this week, the result of self-inflicted wounds from a nail gun, according to the Arapahoe County coroner. Richard Talley, 57, and the company he founded in 2001 were under investigation by state insurance regulators at the time of his death late Tuesday, an agency spokesman confirmed Thursday. It was unclear how long the investigation had been ongoing or its primary focus.
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“It was actually a surprise to me that consumers made up 40 percent of the emergency room visits for these injuries,” says lead study author Hester Lipscomb, associate professor of occupational and environmental medicine at Duke University Medical Center. “What has been historically an occupational hazard is now a hazard to consumers as well.” Anatomy of a Nail Gun Injury Dr. Corey Slovis, professor and chair of the department of emergency medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is no stranger to nail gun injuries. “On Monday, I treated a gentleman who had a nail gun injury in which the nail just missed the optic nerve,” Slovis says. “It did not cause any permanent damage, but it was within one-tenth of an inch from vital structures.” Slovis says his patient was a construction worker by trade. But he adds that consumers who use nail guns are just as apt to receive similarly ghastly wounds if they handle nail guns improperly. “Some of the people who use these nail guns get rid of the safety so it can be fired rapidly,” he says.
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