Nail Gun Injuries Soar

Nail Guns: The Power and the Pain

The CDC today reported that the number of consumers seeking emergency treatment at hospitals for nail gun injuries rose 200% from 1991 to 2005. That trend is likely due to the increase in the availability of nail guns at home hardware stores, but no sales data are available to confirm that, notes the CDC. Workers and consumers should make sure that their nail gun has a safety feature called a sequential-trip trigger, says the CDC in a news release. The CDC also says additional training material on nail gun safety should be provided wherever nail guns are sold and rented. Nail Gun Injuries The new statistics come from hospital emergency rooms nationwide. Data from 2001 to 2005 show that most nail gun injuries — 60% — occurred in workers. Most nail gun injuries occur in men, affect the upper body, and include puncture wounds, bone fractures , and eye injuries, according to the report.
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Actually, the fact that printed guns have been made entirely (or almost so) of plastic suits their agenda in a second way. Not only does that limitation make it physically much more difficult to produce an effective fighting arm, but by claiming that plastic guns are “undetectable” to airport security scanners, etc., they give themselves an opening into regulation (although they would still appear to be out of luck with regard to enforcement), via legislation like Congressman Steve Israel’s (D-NY) HR 1474 , the ” Undetectable Firearms Act, ” restricting non-metallic guns. Never mind that modern scanner technology does not depend on sought-for contraband being made of metal (much more detail here )–they only need to fabricate enough ” stomach-churning ” hysteria to panic the masses into demanding that “something must be done.” It will be interesting to see Rep. Israel’s reaction to this development, given that his real concern about printed guns has little or nothing to do with “undetectability,” and everything to do with uncontrollability.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/first-3-d-printed-metal-gun-is-new-nail-gun-control-s-coffin

First 3-D printed metal gun is new nail in ‘gun control’s’ coffin

A Selective Laser Sintering 3-D printer would help a great deal, too

When using a finish nail gun, you often want the nail countersunk so you can fill and disguise the nail. All finish nail guns I have used do this instantly as the nail is driven. Ugly marks created by hammerheads that strike the wood surface are things of the past when you switch to a nail gun. When pricing nail guns, think of the entire system.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/22/AR2007062200953.html

Nail Gun Injuries Surge

Have you seen this nail gun? Friday, January 24, 2014 To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in. Have you seen this nail gun? The item was taken after the garage door of a property in Bullfields, Newport, was forced open at about 5.15pm on January 20. It is an orange Paslode frame nailer nail gun in an orange case, valued at around 500. Anyone who is offered the item for sale is urged to call police at Saffron Walden on 101. Currently trending
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Have you seen this nail gun?

For most amateur carpenters, the temptation to pick up and cradle these tools is all but irresistible. However, a new Duke University study in the current issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly suggests that inexperienced users may want to take pause before adding a nail gun to their home tool kit, as using these high-powered nail guns may be risky business for amateur carpenters. Researchers looked at hospital reports and government statistics and found that the number of weekend warriors treated for nail gun injuries in American emergency rooms has more than tripled over the past 16 years — a rise mirrored in the increasing availability of nail guns to the average consumer.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=3035560