Nail Guns Hospitalize More Construction Workers Than Any Other Injury – Upi.com

WATCH: Ditzy Australian presenter almost shoots herself in face with nail gun on live TV – NY Daily News

This type of nail gun is a self-contained tool. It does not require an air hose or electric cord to power it. These gas nail guns use a fuel cell, often filled with liquefied petroleum gas, and a spark plug powered by an internal battery. An internal piston, similar to those in a car engine, pushes the nail into the wood when the nail gun safety and trigger are depressed simultaneously. Nail guns save work because they can drive nails quickly and efficiently. You can adjust these tools so they drive the nails to different depths. When you install asphalt roofing shingles, you want the nail head to be snug against the shingle but not driven so far that it tears through the shingle.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/22/AR2007062200953.html

“Research has identified that the risk of a nail gun injury is twice as high when using a multishot contact trigger as when using a single-shot sequential trigger nailer,” OSHA said. “People who operate nail guns are not the only ones at risk of injury. Bystanders — most often co-workers — represent almost 12 percent of all who are injured by nail guns.” Studies show that the use of nail guns equipped with sequential triggers can reduce injuries by half, OSHA said. “If you do not work in the construction industry, and you are working on a small project, consider using a hammer,” OSHA said. “If you do use a nail gun, read the owners manual from cover to cover to understand its operation. Comply with all recommendations regarding safe work practices. Always wear protective equipment including safety glasses, ear protection and heavy work gloves.” 2013 United Press International, Inc.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/07/17/OSHA-Nail-guns-dangerous-send-37000-to-hospital-ER/UPI-89471374102943/

Nail Guns: The Power and the Pain

Skittish Sarah Harris was helping blindfolded mind reader Anthony Laye with a trick during a live ‘Studio 10’ broadcast when she picked up the DIY tool the wrong way. With the magician unable to see what she was doing, she nervously waved the gadget up and down – almost pulling the trigger. She was saved from a terrible fate, however, after audience members started screaming out to warn her about her error. Studio 10 via Youtube Australian TV presenter Sarah Harris (left) points the nail gun at herself during lve ‘Studio 10’ segment, with blindfolded mind reader Anthony Laye unable to point out her error. Studio 10 via Youtube
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/watch-australian-presenter-shoots-nail-gun-live-tv-article-1.1785681

Tips: Nail Gun Safety — Occupational Health & Safety

Air-powered (pneumatic) nail guns have become a popular tool among professionals and consumers over the years, largely due to ease of use, speed, and availability. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and NIOSH data for 2001-2005 indicate about 37,000 people are treated for unintentional nail gun injuries each year in hospital emergency departments across the United States. Forty percent of these injuries occur among consumers in non-work environments.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://ohsonline.com/articles/2008/08/tips-nail-gun-safety.aspx