Pneumatic Hardwood Floor Nailer

Flooring Nailer -- 2-in-1 Flooring Nailer & Flooring Stapler


Pneumatic Hardwood Floor Nailer News:

Floor Nailer – Tools – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Floor Nailer – 152 results like Stanley-Bostitch MIIIFN Flooring Cleat Nailer – M111FN, Powernail Power Nail Model 200 20 Gauge Cleat Nailer, 1″ to 1-1/2″, Powernail …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/floor-nailer/stores-html

Amazon.com: Akuzuki Top Quality 2-in-1 Pneumatic Hardwood Floor …

Can be used on 1/2″, 5/8″ and 25/32″ floor thickness, ,Magazine Capacity (Staples): 100 PCS, ,Magazine Capacity (Cleat Nails): 120 PCS, ,Operation Pressure: 60-115 …

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/Akuzuki-Quality-Pneumatic-Hardwood-Flooring/dp/B000Q38KOO

floor nailer pneumatic | eBay – Electronics, Cars, Fashion …

Find great deals on eBay for floor nailer pneumatic and floor nailer. Shop with confidence.

Original Source: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=floor+nailer+pneumatic

Amazon.com: Akuzuki Top Quality 2-in-1 Pneumatic Hardwood Floor …

Can be used on 1/2″, 5/8″ and 25/32″ floor thickness, ,Magazine Capacity (Staples): 100 PCS, ,Magazine Capacity (Cleat Nails): 120 PCS, ,Operation Pressure: 60-115 …

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/Akuzuki-Quality-Pneumatic-Hardwood-Flooring/dp/B000Q38KOO

Floor Nailer – Tools – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Floor Nailer – 152 results like Stanley-Bostitch MIIIFN Flooring Cleat Nailer – M111FN, Powernail Power Nail Model 200 20 Gauge Cleat Nailer, 1″ to 1-1/2″, Powernail …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/floor-nailer/stores-html


Powernail 445 16 gage Floor Nailer sold by http://floormech

http://floormechanics.com 1-800-372-5090 The Powernail 445 16 gauge Floor Nailer is a tough American made floor nailer. It is a mallet-activated pneumatic na…


Radio K asked How to Install Hardwood floor – which gun type?

I am going to install hardwood flooring and been doing research. Many show people using a flooring nailer but I am wondering if a normal pneumatic gun will work just as well?

And got the following answer:

use a proper floor nailer everyone here is correct but they fail to mention if you dont you will void any warranty for your new wood floor

crazytrain565 asked How does a pneumatic tap cap stapler work?

Do you have to hit it with a mallet or does it work alone?

And got the following answer:

If you are talking about a floor nailer to install hardwood flooring, you bump it with a mallet.
Much less work than using a manual nailer.
There is also a Button-Kap nailer for installing roofing felt caps, you just pull the trigger on that.

Eddie asked I accidentally installed hardwood flooring backwards for half the room. Now what?

I used a pneumatic air nailer and put the nail in the groove instead of the tongue part. As a result, the tongue didn’t fit in the groove (because the nails are there.) It is a large room and I would waste about 14 bundles worth of floor if I ripped it up. I really forced them together. There aren’t a ton of gaps but there are some wide ones. Is there a good way to fix them without totally starting over? Thanks!

And got the following answer:

take the boards out one at a time with a flat bar. I have successfully installed used hardwood flooring

bonnieshell asked Can I rip up the carpet in my room and replace it with a hardwood floor?

I’m planning my room renovation and I kind of hate the carpet in my room, could I just rip it off and then put in a hardwood floor, or something other than carpet? Also, how would I do it?

And got the following answer:

Yes, you can rip up the carpeting and replace it with either hardwood or engineered wood flooring. It’s really not that simple.

First, after you rip up all the carpeting and padding, you need to remove the tack strips around the periphery of your room. The nails are sharp and they’re difficult to work with. You also need to remove every staple (used to install the padding) from your floor.

If you’re planning on genuine, 3/4″ hardwood flooring, your floor needs to be absolutely level. A moisture barrier needs to go down over the underlayment. After allowing the hardwood flooring to adjust to the room temperature and humidity they will be installed in, you will need to nail each strip into place with a pneumatic floor nailer, making sure all seams are tight.

Engineered hardwood is a little more forgiving and is more easily installed by the homeowner. Still, there are things you still need to do, like leveling your floor and putting down the moisture barrier.

You can find out the details at a flooring store if you’re determined to tackle this project yourself. I do not recommend you try to put down 3/4″ hardwood flooring. Leave this one to the professionals.

nerd855 asked Is installing hardwood or laminate floors on stairs too difficult?

Just straight stairs, no curves or anything. Im just wondering if that is best left to the professionals.

And got the following answer:

You can install laminate on stairs using an overlap stair nosing.

When installing laminate on stairs, you will start from the bottom up. Even if you are using a floating installation, the laminate should be glued to the subfloor on the stairs for safety reasons. For added safety, you may also choose to nails the laminate to the subfloor (as long as this doesn’t void the warranty). If you do choose to, I recommend using pneumatic finish nailer and then fill the holes i with a wood filler. Practice nailing on scrap first to make sure nailing does not do too much damamge to your laminate.

Please look at page 45-47on this laminate installation manual for exaclty how to install on steps. www.findanyfloor.com/pub/pdf/Insta…

Check out the forum that I got this info forum. The link is my source.

n50plic asked How do I install a hardwood floor?

We are installing a hardwood floor in a garage loft apartment. The floor will be laid out on top of ply wood. Anyone have any knowledge of how to do this properly? ei nailing, price, best type etc… thank you.
It will be 3/4 inch not lam.

And got the following answer:

omg some of the advice on this 1 is down right crazed… maybe its like my mood .
I hate being too long winded too. But I will try to help you my Friend. Hardwood I assume you mean OAK 3/4 it comes in various grades and bundle of various lengths. nice W/ less knots (select and better) most pricey. ON your existing plywood It should be sound & elliminate any squeaking before installing oak. you dont need to underlay it as w/ C-tile and plywood does not even come 5/8 t&G at least here in USA. There are 2 kinds of nailers manual and pneumatic. They have dif fastner though the manual uses a nail and the pnumatic uses a staple. go with the stapler, but dont worry about catching the joist. the staple is not even big enough to catch it. Use the black paper . Start by rolling out one run of the paper. Always install tounge away obviously (where nail goes) strike a square line for your first run.
3/8 is good for expansion. make sure you secure the entire first row Need toface nail it . Layout can be as desired a good look is continuos stagger. and wont be left with a bunch of shorts finishing it off start the first course with the smallest board then the next use the next size ect until you start over I Said to much Already so GL
Stud finder???

katelin asked How to remove stains from a hard wood floor?

We recently ripped up a carpet that was over a hard wood floor in my dining room. The carpet was there since I moved in and when we ripped it up, we noticed that there were brown stains in various places on the hard wood floor. I tried using baby oil to remove the stains, as well as rubbing alcohol and nailpolish remover. We recently built an addition on my house, so we dont have enough money to hire someone professionally. So my question to all of you is: How can you remove the stains from the hard-wood floor?

And got the following answer:

SORRY BUT… ABSOLUTELY NO TO APPLYING A STAIN TO SANDED WOOD THAT HAS “UNNATURAL STAINS” IN IT! This will only highlight and accentuate the stain that is still there. The most fullproof and effective way to eliminate stains in hardwood is board replacement and then of course sanding and refinishing….sorry again.
If too much of the floor is covered by these stains then you have only two choices here: sanding will lighten them a bit (more than likely will) but they will not go away (especially if they are dark gray to black) and when you reapply sealer to the floor, there they are again, not as dark but definitely there. The other option is to live with it…sand the floor and live with it….
Board replacement is the fullproof way but you must know how to do it and you need a minimum of a table saw, skil saw, chisel, hammer and pneumatic finish nailer (no top nailing with finish nails here!) There was a product sold in Home Depot a few years back that was a bleach that did work but if it bled onto the outside of the stain it could bleach the unstained wood nearly white and there was NO HOPE OF CORRECTING A SCREW UP WITH THIS STUFF. I havent seen it in quite some time and I imagine that they took it out of stores for that reason. Do not rely on those home remedies…you will waste your time especially if these stains have been there for years and are plant overwatering or pet stains…Good luck

mtava2000 asked what is hardwood floor?

how can I install hard wood floor and what do I need

And got the following answer:

Installing hardwood flooring isn’t beyond the reach of many DIYers, but, you will need a power miter saw and a flooring nailer. There are manual nailers and pneumatic nailers both of which a struck with a mallet and toenails a nail at an angle into the tongue of the board. They can be rented, but, if you aren’t speedy, the rent will kill you. In that case, I would purchase one. Here is a pneumatic for $130 mail order and you may have one of these stores near you.
http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=floor+nailer
You can sell when the job is done and recoup a portion of your investment. Also, check pawn shops. But use the price of the wretched Chinese import as a guide. You don’t need contractor quality for a one-time job. Frankly, laminate flooring like Pergo (a brand name) is far easier for an amateur to install. And the better quality you buy, the easier it is. Good luck.