Tips: Nail Gun Safety — Occupational Health & Safety

Nail Gun Injuries Soar in Consumers

Forty percent of these injuries occur among consumers in non-work environments. Among workers, nail gun injuries increased 39 percent from 2004 to 2005. According to the American National Standards Institute, a manual trigger and a contact element in the nose of the nail gun are the two key components on firing mechanisms of nail guns that prevent unintentional firing.
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allowComments:false! displayComments:true! Nail guns can be hugely helpful but also deadly dangerous By Tim Carter, Ive always wanted a powered nail gun to do rough carpentry.
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Nail guns can be hugely helpful but also deadly dangerous – The Washington Post

The CDC today reported that the number of consumers seeking emergencytreatment at hospitals for nail gun injuries rose 200% from 1991 to 2005. That trend is likely due to the increase in the availability of nail guns athome hardware stores, but no sales data are available to confirm that, notesthe CDC. Workers and consumers should make sure that their nail gun has a safetyfeature called a sequential-trip trigger, says the CDC in a news release. The CDC also says additional training material on nail gun safety should beprovided wherever nail guns are sold and rented. Nail Gun Injuries The new statistics come from hospital emergency rooms nationwide.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.webmd.com/news/20070412/nail-gun-injuries-soar